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18TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY IN AUSTRALIA.

Sunday, 28 December 2014

Thursday, 25 December 2014

Australian Survival and Preppers..: Australian Government Fear Campaign. Where Is It G...

Australian Survival and Preppers..: Australian Government Fear Campaign. Where Is It G...: The so called Port Arthur massacre led to the government making new gun laws, making certain types of guns illegal and they initiated a ...

Militia Drill 1747.


Don Troiani's painting of the fighting at Concord Bridge.


THE NEW
 MANUAL EXERCISE,
 by General BLAKNEY:
 To which i< added The
 EVOLUTIONS
 of the
 FOOT,
 by General BLAND
 CORRECTED, WITH ADDITIONS.
 PHILADEPHIA:
 Printed by B. FRANKLIN, at the New Printing
 Office in Market Street, MDCCXLVII
 With modernization< in language and
 punctuation to aid in comprehension  A
 LIST
 Of the Word< of Command, a< they follow
 in Order in the Manual Exercise.
 TAKE CARE
 1. Join your right hand< 28. Draw your bayonet<.
 To your firelock<. 29. Fix your bayonet<.
 2. Poise your firelock<. 30. Rest your bayonet<.
 3. Cock your firelock<. 31. Charge your bayonet<
 4. Present. Breast high.
 5. Fire. 32. Push your bayonet<.
 6. Half cock your fire- 33. Present your bayonet<.
 Lock<. 34. Rest your bayonet< on
 7. Handle your cartridge<. Your left arm.
 8. Open your cartridge<. 35. Shoulder.
 9. Prime. 36. To the front present
10. Shut your pan<. Your arm<.
11. Cast about to charge. 37. Face to the right.
12. Charge with cartridge<. 38.)
13. Draw your rammer<. 39.) Face to the right.
14. Put them in the barrel. 40.)
15. Recover your rammer<. 41. Face to the right about.
16. Return your rammer<. 42. To the left about a<
17. Shoulder. You were.
18. Rest your firelock<. 43.)
19. Order your firelock<. 44.)
20. Ground your firelock<. 45.) Face to the left.
21. Take up your fire- 46.)
 Lock<. 47. To the left about.
22. Rest your firelock<. 48. To the right about.
23. Club your firelock<. 49. Rest on your arm<. 24. Rest your firelock<. 50. Unfix your bayonet<.
25. Secure your firelock<. 51. Return your bayonet<.
26. Shoulder. 52. Rest your firelock<.
27. Rest on your arm<. 53. Shoulder.

 THE NEW
 MANUAL EXERCISE, &c.
 Direction< for position of a soldier under arm<: b="">
 I. A soldier having hi< firelock shouldered must stand with a straight body,
holding up hi< head without moving, and alway< looking toward< the
commanding officer, or he who exercise< the battalion; nor to use any motion but
what the word of command, when given, direct<.
 II. Hi< feet are to be at one step distance (from each other), the heel< in a
straight line, and the toe< turned a little outward<.
 III. The firelock must lie on the left shoulder, and the left hand on the but
end, the thumb being placed in the hollow thereof, pressing the guard against the
breast, that the muzzle may be mounted; the lock must be turned a little outward
till the under part of the butt i< brought opposite to the middle of the body, that
the firelock may be more easily borne.
 "TAKE CARE"
 At thi< word every man must be silent, stand firm, and not move hand or
foot, but attend carefully to the word< of command.
 1. "JOIN YOUR RIGHT HANDS TO YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 1 motion.
 Turn the lock upward< with the left hand and, at the same time, take hold
with your right hand close behind the lock drawing down the firelock a little.
Keep the elbow< square and the muzzle of the firelock at the same height a<
when shouldered.
 The first motion of each word of command must be done instantly upon
giving it; but when there are more motion< than one, you are to tell, "One,
Two," slowly making a small pause between the word<; and on the word "Two" the motion is performed.
2. "POISE YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 1 motion.
 With the left hand, depres< the butt briskly toward< the body, which will
make the piece fly off from your shoulder toward< the front and throw it into an
erect position where you must stop it by seizing it with your left hand just above
the lock, the little finger touching the spring, the arm< extended, the lock to the
front, the left thumb lying up the piece, and the piece so high that you may look
on a level line through the guard.
3. "COCK YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 2 motion<.
 Bring the piece to the right side of our head the lock to the right and
about a< high a< your ear. At the same time bring up your right foot, placing the
heel very near the hollow of the left foot, the toe pointing to the right. Tell
"One, Two!" and seize the cock with your right thumb, bend it, and throw the
piece out to the front, the barrel toward< you and directly perpendicular. Thi< i<
the same posture a< the firelock in the recover.
4. "PRESENT!" 1 motion.
 Take your thumb from the cock and step out to the right with the right
foot, the toe to the right, the body the the front. Place the butt end betwixt the
right shoulder and breast with the elbow< square, the forefinger before the
trigger, the other< behind the guard, the right knee stiff, the left a little bent,
the head upright, the body straight, the muzzle well leveled breast high.
5. "FIRE!" 1 motion.
 Draw the trigger briskly with your forefinger, and if the cock doe< not go
down, don't attempt it again at that time.
6. "HALF COCK YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 2 motion<.
 Bring down the firelock to the right side with the barrel slopeing upward<.
Tell "One, Two!" and with the thumb seize the cock and half bend it.
7. "HANDLE YOUR CARTRIDGES!" 2 motion<.
 Step back with your right foot almost behind your left. At the same time, bring the piece up close under your arm and clap your hand to your cartridge
box. Tell, "One, Two!" and draw forth your cartridge.
8. "OPEN YOUR CARTRIDGES!" 2 motion<.
 Bring your cartridge between your thumb and forefinger to your teeth and
break open the end of it. Tell "One, Two!" and bring it down to your pan ready
to prime.
9. "PRIME!" 1 motion.
 Empty a little of the powder of your cartridge into your pan.
10. "SHUT YOUR PANS!" 1 motion.
 Bring the smaller finger< of your right hand behind the steel (ie. Frizzen),
shut the pan briskly, and let the finger< remain till the next word of command.
11. "CAST ABOUT TO CHARGE!" 1 motion.
 The cartridge remaining between your thumb and forefinger and with the
help of your other finger< on the back of the steel, sink the butt till the piece i<
almost in an upright position bringing it around to your left side. Stepping
forward with your right foot, let the piece fall to a slope by your left side and slip
your right hand up to the muzzle ready to charge.
12. "CHARGE WITH CARTRIDGE!" 2 motion<.
 Turning up the hand with the palm out, enter the cartridge into the muzzle
with the open end downward<. Tell, "One, Two!" and give it a slapwith your
finger< to put it all the way in.
13. "DRAW YOUR RAMMERS!" 3 motion<.
 Place your forefinger on the top of the rammer gripping it at the same time
between your thumb and middle finger. Tell "One, Two!" and draw your
rammer a< far a< it can reach. Slip down your hand briskly taking the rammer
near the muzzle, your thumb and forefinger being turned downward<. Tell
"One, Two!", draw your rammer quite out, turn and shorten it to a hand'< breadth
on the right breast holding it in the same degree of slope with your piece. 14. "PUT THEM IN THE BARREL!" 3 motion<.
 Bring the rammer a little above the muzzle, place the thick end on the
cartridge, and thrust it down a< far a< your hand will permit. Tell "One, Two!",
raise your hand, and seize the rammer about the middle and thrust it down till
your hand touche< the muzzle. Tell "One, Two!", seize it again at the top
thrusting it down a< far a< it will do and ram down the charge.
15. "RECOVER YOUR RAMMERS!" 2 motion<.
 Draw forth about half your rammer with a quick motion, give it a spring,
and briskly slip down your hand, your thumb turned downward<, and take it by
the middle. Tell "One, Two!", draw it quite out, turn and shorten it against your
breast to nine inche<, and hold it in the same slope with the piece.
16. "RETURN YOUR RAMMERS!" 3 motion<.
 Bring the small end of the rammer with a gentle turn under the barrel, place
it in the stock, and thrust it in a< far a< your hand will permit. Tell "One, Two!",
raise your hand, and seize the rammer in the middle, and thrust it down again till
your hand touche< the muzzle. Tell "One, Two!", raise your hand and place the
palm of it upon the upper end of your rammer and thrust it quite down.
17. "SHOULDER!" 3 motion<.
 Bring the firelock upright opposite to your left shoulder near your ear, the
lock in the bending of the left elbow, seizing at the same time under the lock
with your right hand. Tell "One, Two!", fall back with your right foot, and at
the same time let the piece fall smartly on your shoulder seizing it with your left
hand on the butt. Tell "One, Two!", and quit with the right hand letting it fall
to the right side.
18. "REST YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 3 motion<.
 Join your right hand to your firelock a< (done) in explanation 1. Tell "One,
Two!", and come to the poise a< in explanation 2. Tell "One, Two!", and turning
the barrel toward< you, bring the butt end down to the inside of the right knee
stepping at the same time a little back with your right foot, the toe pointing to
the right, the right knee stiff, the left a little bending, keeping your body very straight. The firelock must lean a little to the front, and both the body and face
must present themselve< to the front a< much a< possible without constraint.
19. "ORDER YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 3 motion<.
 Raise the muzzle of the firelock so that it i< directly upright by the right
side. At the same time slip up the left hand a< high a< the right shoulder and sink
the piece with the right a< low a< you can without constraint or stooping. Tell
"One, Two!", (then) quit (your firelock) with the right hand, sink the firelock
with the left over the toe; at the same time seize with the right hand near the
muzzle , the thumb upward<. Tell "One, Two!", quit the left hand letting it fall
on the left side. Bring up the right foot to it< line placing the firelock on the
outside even with the little toe, the lock outward<. Thi< (last motion) i< to be
performed in such a manner that the right foot and the butt end of the firelock
come to the ground at the same time.
 The heel< must be in a straight line (at one step distance from each other),
the toe< turned outward and the right arm, from the hand to the elbow, running
along the outside of the firelock, the left arm down the left side.
20. "GROUND YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 4 motion<.
 Turn the firelock with the right hand till the lock point< to the rear and
the barrel toward< your right side. At the same time, quit the muzzel with the
right hand, seize it with the left, and bring the right hand down to the middle of
the barrel and seize it there in such a manner a< that both hand< join the piece at
once, placing the right foot behind the butt, the toe pointing to the right. Tell
"One, Two!", step a moderate pace forward with the left foot, lay down the
firelock bending the right knee at the lock (with) the piece (lying) in a straight
line to the front. Tell "One,Two!", rise up briskly bringing your left foot to it<
place. Throw off the right hand open to the front. Tell "One,Two!", turn your
right foot on the heel over the butt and at the same time turn your right hand to
your side, the palm inward<, your body full to the front.
21. "TAKE UP YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 4 motion<.
 Turn the right foot on the heel over the butt turning the toe directly to
the right. At the same time throw off your right hand with an easy motion. Tell
"One, Two!", step forward with the left foot, the right knee bending to the lock,
taking the firelock by the middle of the barrel with your right hand. Tell "One, Two!", rise up with the firelock bringing it up with your left hand at the muzzle,
the piece close to your right shoulder, your left foot at the same time coming to
it< line. Tell "One, Two!" and quit (the piece) with the left hand, bringing up
the right hand to the muzzle, turning the barrel toward< your shoulder, the lock
to the right and placing the right foot on the inside of the butt. Thi< posture i<
the same a< in explanation 19.
 Observe that, in grounding and taking up their arm<, the men are to hold
up their head<.
22. "REST YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 3 motion<.
 Quit the muzzle with the right hand and seize it with the left. At the same
time, seize it with the left. At the same time, seize the barrel with the right
hand a< low a< the arm will extend without constraint or bending the body. Tell
"One, Two!", bring the firelock directly before you, the right hand a< high a< the
face, the lock outward<, at the same time seizing it with the left so that the little
finger touches the spring. Tell "One, Two!", quit with your right hand, let fall
the arm< turning the lock to the right, and place the right hand behind the lock.
At the same time step away with the right foot observing the position of
explanation 18.
23. "CLUB YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 4 motion<.
 Keep the firelock firm in your left hand, cast the butt from you with the
right so that the barrel passe< close to your shoulder, and take hold of the firelock
a< low a< you can reach with the right hand, the muzzle and left thumb
downward< and the lock to the right a< high a< your cheek. Tell "One,Two!",
raise the firelock with the right hand opposite to the left shoulder turning the
lock to the front and bringing up the right foot. At the same time, seize it with
the left hand very near the muzzle with extended arm<. Tell "One, Two!", bring
the firelock to the left shoulder with the lock upward< and the elbow< square.
Tell "One, Two!", bring your right hand briskly down to the right side at the
same time let fall your left elbow. Stand in the shoulder position.
24. "REST YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 4 motion<.
 Turn the firelock with the left hand inward<. Thi< bring< the barrel
upward<. At the same time, take hold of it with the right hand a little above the
left keeping the elbow< square. Tell "One, Two!", bring the firelock nimbly before your face with outstreched arm<, the barrel to the front. Tell "One,
Two!", sink the firelock with the right hand opposite to the right side close to
the ear, the lock to the right. At the same time, place the left hand behind the
firelock, the thumb downward< and the little finger touching the spring. Tell
"One, Two!", quit with your right hand bringing the butt down passing the
barrel close by your right elbow. Place your right hand behind the lock, step
back with the right foot, and come to your rest.
25. "SECURE YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 2 motion<.
 Bring the piece briskly to an upright position opposite to the left shoulder
turning the barrel to the front and slipping the left hand at the same time to a
hand'< breadth above the lock and bring up the right foot. Tell "One, Two!",
quit with your right hand throwing the firelock under the left arm, the lock a
little below the elbow, the barrel downward<, the muzzle within a foot of the
ground.
26. "SHOULDER!" 3 motion<.
 Bring the firelock up nimbly to the position described in the first motion of
explanation 17. Tell "One, Two!", quit with the left hand bringing it under the
right placing the firelock on the left shoulder. Tell "One, Two!" and quit with
your right hand bringing it down briskly to your right side.
27. "REST ON YOUR ARMS!" 4 motion<.
 Join your right hand to the firelock. Tell "One, Two!" and come to the
poise. Tell "One, Two!" and quit the firelock with your right hand sinking it
with your left a< low a< your arm will permit without constraint. Seize it at the
same time with your right hand near the muzzle. Tell "One,Two!" and bring the
butt to the ground slipping your left hand at the same time up to your right.
Keep your elbow< square.
28. "DRAW YOUR BAYONETS!" 2 motion<.
 Step back with your right foot and seize your bayonet with your right
hand. Tell "One, Two!", draw it out briskly, bring it up and place it upright
over the muzzle. Enter it on the barrel.
29. "FIX YOUR BAYONETS!" 3 motion<.  Thrust down the socket of the bayonet a< far a< the notch will permit. Tell
"One, Two!", turn the bayonet from you and fix it. Tell "One, Two!", quit the
handle of the bayonet and seize the firelock just under it with your right hand
placing the palm on the back of the left (hand).
30. "REST YOUR BAYONETS!" 3 motion<.
 Raise the firelock with your right hand in a perpendicular line a< high a<
your forehead. Slipping down your left (hand) at the same time, seize the
firelock a little above the lock. Tell "One, Two!", quit the firelock with your
right hand and raise it with the left. At the same time, seize it with your right
hand under the lock observing the same position a< directed by explanation 2.
Tell "One, Two!" and, turning the barrel toward< you, come to your rest, a< in
explanation 18.
31. "CHARGE YOUR BAYONETS BREAST HIGH!" 2 motion<.
 Bring up the butt to your right shoulder with the piece level to the front a<
in presenting to give fire. Tell "One, Two!" and step back with your right foot
slipping your right hand behind the butt and carrying the piece a< far a< you can
extend your right arm, the barrel resting on the bend of your left but still level
and pointing to the front, the thumb and finger< of the left hand pointing to the
butt.
32. "PUSH YOUR BAYONETS!" 2 motion<.
 Push your firelock with both hand< straight forward until your left arm i<
quite extended, the left knee bending a little, and the body leaning somewhat
forward. Tell "One, Two!" and bring it back to it< former place.
33. "PRESENT YOUR BAYONETS!" 1 motion.
 Bring forward the firelock a< if you were going to make a second push, but
sink the butt, turning it at the same time three quarter< around with the lock
passing under. At the same time, kneel down on the right knee facing to the
front, place the butt in the bending of the body on the left side with the lock
upward, the left elbow resting on the left knee and the piece sloping upward< to
the front. 34. "REST YOUR BAYONETS ON YOUR LEFT ARM!" 1 motion.
 Rise up, turn the lock to the front, take hold with your right hand below
the lock. Sinking the firelock, take hold of the cock and steel with the left with
the cock lying on the middle finger and the steel on the lower joint of the
thumb, the under part of the stock resting on the bend or middle of the left arm,
the barrel upward<, the butt sloping downward< toward< the middle space
between your thigh<, keeping both hand< a< low a< you can without constraint.
The butt and muzzle must be kept at an equal distance from your body, the
firelock running in a triangular line.
35. "SHOULDER!" 3 motion<.
 Quit the lock with the left hand and, with a spring of your left arm, throw
the piece off from your body; seize it above the lock bringing the piece up to
the poise. Tell"One, Two!" and, turning the barrel outward< with your right
hand, quit with the left and seize the butt, at the same time bringing down the
piece to the left shoulder. Tell "One, Two!" and bring down your right hand to
your side.
36. "TO THE FRONT, PRESENT YOUR ARMS!" 3 motion<.
 Thi< i< only coming to a rest, a< in explanation 18.
37. "FACE TO THE RIGHT!" 3 motion<.
 Bring up the firelock with a quick motion before you placing the right heel
in the hollow of the left foot, the toe (of the right foot) pointing to the right, the
lock a< high a< your face, the barrel toward< you, the arm< extended. Tell "One,
Two!" and face on the left heel to the right a quarter of the circle keeping the
firelock recovered. Tell "One, Two!" and come nimbly to your rest stepping
back a little with the right foot a< in explanation 18.
 In the performing of the second motion, which i< the facing, the soldier<
must take care not to move their left heel< from the ground but only to turn them
(so) that they may keep their rank< and file< straight. (They must also take care)
to place their right feet in a line with their left keeping their firelock< in the true
position of a recover till they perform the third motion, which i< the rest.
38, 39, 40. "FACE TO THE RIGHT!" 3 motion< each.  Each of these word< of command must be performed at 3 motion<, a< i<
above directed in explanation 37, which complete< the circle in four time<.
41. "FACE TO THE RIGHT ABOUT!" 3 motion<.
 Thi< i< to be performed at 3 motion< a< in the foregoing explanation only
they face half the circle to the right.
42. "TO THE LEFT ABOUT AS YOU WERE!" 3 motion<.
 Thi< i< done on the left heel a< in the above explanation 41, only they face
half the circle to the left, which bring< them to their proper front.
43, 44, 45, 46. "FACE TO THE LEFT!" 3 motion< each.
 These facing< must be performed in the same manner a< those to the right,
on the left heel, with thi< difference only: that they face to the left.
47. "TO THE LEFT ABOUT!" 3 motion<.
 Thi< i< half the circle to the left.
48. "TO THE RIGHT ABOUT AS YOU WERE!" 3 motion<.
 You are to face half the circle to the right, which bring< you to your proper
front, and complete< the facing<.
49. "REST ON YOUR ARMS!" 3 motion<.
 Come to the poise. Tell "One, Two!" and sink the firelock with your left
hand a< in explanation 27.
50. "UNFIX YOUR BAYONETS!" 3 motion<.
 Slip the bayonet up with the right hand. Tell "One, Two!" and turn it
toward< you. Tell "One, Two!" and slip it quite off the barrel keeping it upright.
51. "RETURN YOUR BAYONETS!" 3 motion<.  Step back a little with your right foot and, turning the point of the
bayonet down, enter it in the scabbard. Tell "One, Two!" and thrust it quite in.
Tell "One, Two!" and bring up your foot seizing the firelock with your right
hand.
52. "REST YOUR FIRELOCKS!" 3 motion<.
 A< before in explanation 30.
53. "SHOULDER!" 3 motion<.
 Bring the firelock up briskly to a poise. Tell "One, Two!" and shoulder a<
directed in explanation 35.
WHEN the battalion i< to make ready at three word< of command, it i< to be
performed in the following manner<: b="">
1. "MAKE READY!"
 At thi< they are to perform all that i< contained in the first three word< of
command of the manual exercise.
2. "PRESENT!"
 At thi< command they are only to perform what i< directed by the fourth
word of command of the said exercise.
3. "GIVE FIRE!"
 Thi< i< performed a< in explanation 5, after which they are to go on with
the exercise till they have primed and loaded, and when they come to the
shouldering of the firelock, they are to finish, which contain< the 17th word of
command.
 THIS complete< the Manual Exercise 

http://www.thebattalion.org/files/Blakney%27s%20New%20Exercise%201747%20of%20Foot.pdf

Wednesday, 24 December 2014

Tudor Monastery Farm: 06 Autumn. Harvest.

Tudor Monastery Farm: 05

Tudor Monastery Farm: 04 Lead Mining.

Tudor Monastery Farm: 03

Tudor Monastery Farm: 02

Tudor Monastery Farm: 01

1485 to 1603. The Tudor Period and Winter Solstice.

I believe, that to get a better grasp of 18th century life, you need to go back in time. That is why our 18th century Living History group's time period is 1680 to 1760. For me to remain in my period of interest, 1740, as I get older, I must move my Birth date back in time !
I hope you enjoy the following videos. I have jumped ahead a little to Xmas, as it is that time of year, but I will include all of the series.
Keith.




Identifying Touchwood/Punk Wood.

More on Punkwood or Touchwood.

Recently someone contacted me and told me that to date they had not managed to make fire with flint and steel using uncharred punk wood. At the same time he quoted a passage from an Indian captivity document claiming that a John Tanner had indeed accomplished this. 
However, having read the passage that I think he is referring to, I think it more likely that John Tanner used gunpowder on the rotten wood in order for it to catch a spark. Here below is the quote in question:

"Owing to our hands being benumbed with the cold, it was long before we could extricate ourselves from our snow shoes, and we were no sooner out of the water than our moccasins and clothes were frozen so stiff that we could not travel. I began also to think that we must die. But I was not like my Indian brother, willing to sit down and wait patiently for death to come. I kept moving about to the best of my power, while he lay in a dry place by the side of the bank where the wind had blown away the snow. I at length found some very dry rotten wood which I used as a substitute for spunk, and was so happy as to raise a fire. We then applied ourselves to thaw and dry our moccasins, and when partly dry we put them on, and went to collect fuel [Page 24] for a larger fire than we had before been able to make".

Now although no mention is made here of using gunpowder, it is obvious to me that this method was known to John Tanner, and that he had used this method before. Note this earlier comment by John Tanner:

"Fortunately the water was not deep about the rock, nor between it and the land, and though a thin ice had formed, I was able to break it, and carry my children on shore. But here we had nearly perished from cold, as my spunk wood was wet, and I had no means of kindling a fire, until I thought to split open my powder horn, when I found in the middle of the mass of powder, a little which the water had not reached. This enabled me to kindle a fire, and was the means of saving all our lives".

Note also the term "spunk" is used and not "punk". This I think is the first time I have heard this term used for tinder rather than sulphur tipped splints which are known as spunks.

Here are a couple of videos I made on the use of gunpowder for making fire:


Thursday, 18 December 2014

A Little Chaos - Main Trailer

WISHING YOU ALL A MERRY XMAS.

Christmas Coach 1795 by Jean Leon Ferris

Well there is only about a week to go to Xmas, and I hope you all have a good one. Our family will not be here until the 28th, so I guess we will have some sort of Xmas then. Being in Australia, this means Xmas in Summer, something I have never got a handle on and some how it just doesn't feel like Xmas. We will however celebrate Winter Solstice.
I hope you all get something from Santa that you want or need. Usually for me it is something inexpensive & practicle like some beeswax or linen thread, but this year I simply can't think what to put on my "Wants List". But I am thankful that all my family are well, and that I am still relatively mobile ! I must get out in the forest more once the fire season is over and Winter has arrived. I hope we get some snow this year that will actually lay !!!

Take care everyone and stay safe.
Regards, Keith.




Experimental Archaeology Conference.



 Our new poster for the 9th Experimental Archaeology Conference (EAC9) in Ireland, 16-18 January 2015 - the world's leading experimental archaeologists, with over 50 lectures, posters and demonstrations, all the way from building Neolithic houses, to baking Medieval bread, from making inks, to teaching children through experimental archaeology. Register at the website http://www.ucd.ie/archaeology/eac9/ and come to Ireland! (with thanks to Conor McDermott, UCD School of Archaeology for the lovely poster, with images from UCD Centre for Experimental Archaeology and Ancient Technologies!)

Friday, 12 December 2014

The Old Foodie: Christmas in 1674.

The Old Foodie: Christmas in 1674.: No matter how many guests you are having over the next day or two, and how much cooking you are submerged in, the following Christmas din...

The Old Foodie: Baked Beef for Christmas.

The Old Foodie: Baked Beef for Christmas.: We had a Scottish Christmas recipe for cod’s head yesterday, and today it is the turn of the Welsh – or at least, the turn of the arist...

Monday, 1 December 2014

17th Century Knitting Sheath.

Knitting sheaths were attached to the waist and used to support one knitting needle so that the knitter only needed to use one hand for plain knitting. Many women supplemented their incomes by making knitted goods for sale and a knitting sheath made it possible to knit while carrying out other domestic chores, in particular carrying or feeding infants.
Knitting sheaths were often made as love tokens. This carved boxwood example bears the initials AT and the date 1679 with an inscription, 'I am box and brass within, my place is on your apron string'. The hole at the top of the sheath to hold the needle is lined with brass.
Brass lined wood knitting sheath, English 1679.

Thursday, 27 November 2014

Inventories of war: soldiers' kit.

If you go to this site, you will find a list of the items shown in these images.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/11006139/Inventories-of-war-soldiers-kit-from-1066-to-2014.html?frame=2994172
1645 New Model Army musketeer, Battle of Naseby

1709 private sentinel, Battle of Malplaquet

1815 private soldier, Battle of Waterloo

Saturday, 22 November 2014

Australian Survival and Preppers..: The Dangers Of Using 1080 Poison In Our Environmen...

I am posting this here because many of us fish and hunt as part of our living history interpretation, and we eat this food, we are not hunting for fun or sport, and the dangers of this poison to ourselves and our families is very real.
Keith.








Australian Survival and Preppers..: The Dangers Of Using 1080 Poison In Our Environmen...: My sincere thanks to R.C. Hurly and my good friend Russ Tyenna for bringing these problems to my further attention. Keith. 1080 poison is ...

Sunday, 16 November 2014

Saturday, 15 November 2014

British Tars, 1740-1790: Without, 1757

British Tars, 1740-1790: Without, 1757: "Without._from the London Gazette of 11 June, 1757," T. Ewart,  Lewis Walpole Library . Ewart provides us a political piece d...

Australian Survival and Preppers..: Butchering Meat.

Australian Survival and Preppers..: Butchering Meat.: 1. Slaughtering and raw materials for meat preservation Product quality and shelf-life of preserved meat and meat products depend on the ...

Australian Survival and Preppers..: Simple techniques for production of dried meat

Australian Survival and Preppers..: Simple techniques for production of dried meat: 2. Simple techniques for production of dried meat PRINCIPLES OF MEAT DRYING Drying meat under natural temperatures, humidity and circ...

Sunday, 2 November 2014

More On Blankets.

American Checked Blanket c. “1600 - 1800” (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

“Point” Blanket reported to be carried by Private Henry Marble of Massachusetts during the Revolution.  White Wool, 2 3/4” Indigo Blue Stripes and Points(Museum of the Fur Trade)


Fragment of Striped Du
el, A Tracking Cloth of English Manufacture, Found at Burr’s Hill, Warren, Rhode Island, a 17th Century Wampanoug Indian Burial Site(And Site where the 18th Century Material Culture Resource Center used to play Little League Baseball) (Haenreer Museum of Anthropology)
English Manufacture (For the American Market) Rose Blanket c. 1750 - 1830

Details
Height 29.0cm, width 23.5cm
Printed by Smith, W. and Philips, J. and N. Ltd
Made for Smith, W. and Co. Ltd

 Early / Mid Wool Center Seam Solid Color Blanket 18th to 19th Century (Private Collection)

Wool Center Seam Solid Color Blanket 18th to Early / Mid 19th Century (Private Collection)

“June 24th, 1757...Col. Stephen is highly blameable to take any of the Regimental supplies for the Indians... If any of the  Dutch Blankets rem’n, and not wanted for the Indians, I’ve no objection to their being replaced in the room of those made use of.”

in 1716 “Indian Peggy” appeared before the Commissioner of Trade with a “French man” purchased by her brother and given to her. The man had come dearly, costing her brother “a gun, a white Duffield match coat, two broadcloth match coats, a cutlass and some powder and paint”. Peggy was willing to exchange her hostage for the gun, and “the value of the rest of the goods might be paid her in strouds‘ 


 Whitney Blankets.
Witnedown  was at one time the trademark of Smith and Philips Ltd blanket makers of Witney.  Whipped blankets were ones which had a strip of silky material sewn over their edges, bound blankets were finished with a row of blanket stitching, whipped blankets were the cheaper of the two.
Wars and natural disasters have always created sudden demands for large quantities of blankets and Witney manufacturers received many Government orders over the years. The Seven Years' War (1756-1763), the American War of Independence, the Napoleonic Wars and two World Wars all brought blanket booms to the town, although some were very short lived. Cabin blankets for use at sea were first made in the early 18th century [3]. Many of these blankets would not have been of the best quality and were plain unbleached or dyed grey or olive.
    Witney did  not really specialize in or become famous for blankets until the early 17th century. Before this time its main trade was undyed broadcloth (in common with many other weaving industries in the country at that time). This was a kind of coarse, heavy woollen cloth  made from fell wool and although it was commonly known as 'blanketing' many other things apart from blankets were made from it. It had warmth, weight and water repellent qualities that made it very useful for clothing such as coats and petticoats. In 1716 John Gay referred to this in his poem 'Trivia': 
True Witney Broad-cloth with its Shag unshorn,
Unpierc'd is in the lashing Tempest worn 
Links:




Saturday, 1 November 2014

1758 Indian Goods List.

Posted on March 18, 2011
“Goods supplied to Indians by Colonel Byrd”, from McDowell, William L. Colonial Records of South Carolina: Documents Relating to Indian Affairs, 1754-1765. Columbia, SC.  University of South Carolina Press.  pp.456-458. These were likely primarily provided to the Cherokee, even though not always stated as such.  (Thanks to J. Mullins)
A List of Goods taken from the Traders by Colonel Byrd for the Use of the Indians

April 4th, 1758
6 Boxes Paint
1 Brass Kettle Wt. 4-1/2
5 Pieces Strowds
3 Pieces Booting
3 Guns
1 Piece Stript Flannel
7 Pro Ear Babbs
S Ps. Blanketts
1 Dozen Hatchets
2-1/2 Lb. Small Beads
1 Gross Cadice
1 Gross Gartering
2 Dozen Pro Ear Babbs
4-1/2 Bunches Barley Corn Beads
12-1/2 Lb. Gun Powder
25 Lb. Lead
4-1/2 Dozen Knives
3 Pieces Ribbon
14 Tobacco
1 Peck Salt
14 Yards Stript Cotton
1 Gallon Rum
2 Pieces Cadice
2 Ps. Gartering

1703 Trade Goods.




Historically Speaking Blog.

Weighing in on the Progressive Community